Category Archives: torture

weeks in review: a release, an arrest, a discovery and 2 belly-dancing

Early April [2-4, 2017], the Egyptian president visited the US  and his visit included Egyptians standing  on both sides of the street, waving flags and greeting him as his convoy passed in Washington DC. He was in the States to ask for the US president’s financial and military support for which he only received promises of cooperation. Social media made fun of some of the images that surfaced of his infamous meeting with the US president in which they spoke of collaboration against terrorism. One image in particular showed the US president sitting at his desk in the Oval Office with the Egyptian president standing by his side – contrary to all protocols where both presidents should either be seated or standing up. The US president himself tweeted the pictures.

In the Oval Office

The Coptic Church also, prior to the explosions of the two churches in Tanta and Alexandria, asked the Copts to mobilize and greet him. Even though it was not the Copts alone who went to greet him, many still accused the Church of being hypocritical.

Parliament Continue reading

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the years of their discontents – on Alaa and Malek

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” ― Rob Siltanen

This post is a celebration of the lives of two young Egyptian activists who have been unjustly imprisoned where they remain to this day. It is a celebration lest we forget – of those two brave young men – the ‘crazy ones’ – who believed in change and tried to change at a very high personal cost. Those are: Alaa Abdel Fattah and Malek Adly. Continue reading